Skin TypeKnowing your skin type will guide you towards your ideal skin care routine for a healthy glow and confidence boost. Here are the most common traits of dry, normal, combination and sensitive skin.

Dry Skin Attributes:

  • Rough or papery texture
  • Feels tight and looks thin
  • Small pores
  • Absorbs moisture quickly
  • Minimal oil production*

Dry or alipidic skin does not produce enough sebum (oil) to protect it from environmental pollutants and the signs of aging. The skin is often sensitive because the acid mantle – the natural barrier between your skin and the outside world – is weakened. Look for skin care products known as occlusives, which are thick moisturizers that protect the acid mantle and to develop a healthy balance between skin and oil.

Try:  Petal Purity Facial Cleanser followed by Rosehip Oil Moisturizing Serum or Today Serum before bed and follow up with Rosey Cheeks Facial Cream after you brush your teeth in the morning. If you’re a morning shower person skip the evening cleanse (but always remove makeup!).

*See note under Oily Skin

Dry vs. Dehydrated

Dehydrated skin is lacking in water instead of oil, and can strike all skin types. Dehydrated skin can look thin or flakey, and can feel like a bit like tissue paper to the touch. Dehydration of the skin is caused by internal factors such as caffeine, alcohol, and medications as well as external factors such as sun exposure, winter weather, harsh products or over-exfoliation. Drink plenty of water or herbal teas and moisturize regularly.

Normal Skin Attributes:

  • Usually blemish-free
  • Matte or glowy appearance, but not shiny
  • Pores are normal size, noticeable around the T-zone

Normal skin can fluctuate between all the skin types, but won’t do so radically or for an extended period of time. While it’s the ideal skin type, it still requires regular care to keep skin and oil production in healthy unity.

Try:  Petal Purity Facial Cleanser followed by Rosey Cheeks Facial Cream. Boost your skin’s glow by adding a few drops of Argan Oil Moisturizing Serum to your facial cream application.

Combination Skin Attributes:

  • Parts of the face can be oily while others are normal or dry
  • T-zone and chin are often the oiliest parts of the face
  • Pores are more obvious outside the T-zone
  • Skin around the edges of the face can be flakey and dehydrated

With a little tender loving care, it is possible to tame combination skin. The key to balancing the oil and dryness is with gentle cleansers and regular exfoliating to remove dead skin cells and combat acne. Regular exfoliating could mean anywhere from daily to weekly, let your skin decide. Water-based products are ideal.

Try:  Petal Purity Exfoliating Facial Cleanser followed by our gently astringent  Rose Dew Facial Toner and a generous application of Rosey Cheeks Facial Cream.

Oily Skin Attributes:

  • Excessive oil production*
  • Pores are large
  • Prone to blemishes
  • Can look sallow and thick

Oily, or lipidic, skin needs a balanced regime of moisturizer and cleanser. Too much cleansing will strip the acid mantle that protects skin from environmental pollutants to cause irritation, while too little will lead to breakouts and speed the signs of aging. Too little moisture will cause skin to continue to overproduce oil, while a thick moisturizer may not entirely absorb. Exfoliate regularly to remove dead skin cells that can become trapped in the pores by oil and cause acne. The good news is that oily skin is slow to show the signs of aging!

Try:  Petal Purity Exfoliating Facial Cleanser – gentle enough to use daily – followed by  Orange Blossom Toner and Orange Blossom Facial Cream, both designed specifically for oily skin.

*Excess oil production can also be a sign of dry skin. When this happens it’s because the skin was dry for so long that the body overcompensates in oil production. If astringent products irritate your skin rather than combat oil, you likely have dry skin.

Sensitive Skin:

  • Fragile, red, and appears thin
  • Flushes red easily and it’s common to have conditions that cause redness such as rosacea
  • Especially common in descendants of Northern Europeans

Sensitive skin has become more common thanks to our society’s hurried, stressful idea of normal, but it is also caused by harsh weather, sun exposure, environmental pollutants and genetics. It is fussy, but not impossible to pamper. Exfoliate sparingly; you may find just gently removing cleanser with a washcloth is enough. Read skin care product labels carefully and avoid anything astringent or with added scent, and avoid deep cleansing masks. Stop using products immediately if there is any sign of irritation.

Try:  Petal Purity Facial Cleanser, which is cream-based so does not suds up and strip skin of moisture. Follow with  Rosey Cheeks Facial Cream. If you’re interested in a moisture-boosting serum like our Argan Oil Moisturizing Serum use that in place of a cream moisturizer as using both may overwhelm your skin.

My skin doesn’t fit any of these categories.

That’s not unheard of. The theme that links all skin types together is balance. Be open to the idea of trying different routines and products, and keep track of what your skin likes and does not like. If you find something that works, stick with it even if you’re tempted to try something else because regularly changing your routine may not do your skin any favours.

SPF is a number that’s put on sun protection to tell you how much longer you can stay in the sun than if you weren’t wearing any protection at all. So if you can stay in the sun for 10 minutes without burning, then with a Sun Protection Factor of 15 you will be able to stay in the sun for 150 minutes without burning.

I want to explain these numbers a little bit more and how they come up with them. First you need to know about the UV rays. There are 2 types of UV rays that we get exposed to. One is UVB and that one [causes] more of a surface damage, so the first few layers of the skin get affected by the UVB rays, and these are what cause burns. The UVA rays are not as easy to detect because you don’t get red, but they are doing damage at an even deeper level into your skin, and they can attack collagen and elastin. UVA rays are what actually cause a lot of aging and wrinkles.

Tanning beds are so bad for your skin because they’re mostly UVA rays, and they will just age your skin like nobody’s business. That’s a definite no-no!

I want you to be aware of something. The FDA and the Environmental Working Group suggest that you do not use Sun Protection Factor over 50, and this is why; when they do testing for SPF in the lab, they’re only testing UVB ray exposure because they look at how fast the skin goes red. What companies have learnt to do is put antioxidants and anti-inflammatories into their formulas so that the redness is reversed by these ingredients, and it jacks up the SPF. What’s wrong with that is you are still getting exposed to these rays, you’re just not getting red because it’s being reversed. This is giving a false sense of protection for people; you’re getting a lot more sun than you think you are, because it’s not about redness at this point because there are ingredients that are counter-acting it. This doesn’t mean you’re not getting the harmful rays, your DNA is not being attacked, whatever – it’s still happening. Just be aware of that when you’re using these really high SPFs. My preference is that you use lower SPF and you take care of your skin other ways; you don’t go outside as much, you find shade, you go under an umbrella at the beach, you wear a hat, you wear UV-protective clothing. The 60+, the 50, even, it’s just giving a false sense of security to people, and I really do believe people are damaging their skin and they don’t know any better because it’s not going red when it would usually go red. So keep that in mind and stay protected.

We’ve just gotten into the months that we’re starting to spend a lot of time in the sun so it’s really important that we’re protecting our skin from damage; from skin cancer, from premature aging, from everything that overexposure to sun rays will do to it.

There are 2 types of sunscreens you can choose from. The first I’m going to talk about is physical sunscreen; zinc or titanium oxide. Those 2 minerals get applied to the skin and they act like tiny little mirrors deflecting the rays off your skin. The second kind is chemicals; oxybenzone, homosalate, octinoxate, octyl salicylate. These cause a chemical reaction by taking the light and turning it into a different form of energy, and it’s usually heat. This is why if you get these in your eyes, it burns badly, and uh…not fun. My preference is definitely the first one, the physical sunscreen, because it’s gentle on your skin; it’s not going to absorb into your system and create a toxic stew, whereas we know now that these petrochemicals tend to absorb in, and there’s all kinds of issues that we’re starting to understand, such as endocrine disruption, and, you know, cancer.
I’m not saying that sunscreen causes cancer, but I’m saying that you have to be careful of what you’re putting on your skin every single day, and the impact it could have on your body. Not to mention the fact that oxybenzone is a known hormone disrupter – one of the more common ones in the market – and is eco-toxic. So if you go and swim near a reef, it can bleach the reef, and it is responsible for a lot of human damage of reef around the world. And that should tell you something about the actual chemical.

Physical sunscreens all the way! I love zinc; it’s not as whitening now, because before we had these larger molecules, so when you think about zinc you just think, like, white – everywhere. But fortunately they’ve gotten the molecule nice and small – micronized – and so it’s not as whitening. You want to go small but not too small, because the nano-sized, the nano-particle zinc, does absorb to damage skin, does absorb through it, and we really don’t know what this nano-sized zinc, or titanium for that matter, is going to do to your system. There’s just not enough research at this point in time. There have been some damning reports about it being eco-toxic as well, so look for non-nano versions.

My favourite sunscreen is Goddess Garden. It’s non-whitening, a super non-toxic formula, and it doesn’t clog up my pores; I have to be very careful about using stuff that’s too greasy or heavy because I will break out.

The ingredients I really want you to avoid are; oxybenzone, retinyl palmitate – because apparently when sun hits retinyl palmitate it can create a carcinogenic type of damage to your cells, so stay away from that – and citrus essential oils, because they contain furocoumarins and they are phototoxic so they will make your skin more vulnerable to UV rays. I just read an article this morning about how even drinking orange juice, they’re linking that to melanoma, so because of these furocoumarins they’ll make your skin just super vulnerable to the sun. So if you see a skin care product that has sweet orange, lime, lemon, bergamot, or grapefruit, stay away! Stay away from the summer, because if you’re going to be out in the sun with it…I don’t think it’s ever a good idea in skin care, but especially if you’re going to be out in the sun.

June 1, 2015 marks exactly one year of being in our new space at 72 St. Leger St. Kitchener, Ontario. It took until December to be fully up and running. It was a huge project – PHEW. Very happy and grateful every day I come into work!

Check out our before and afters. This is where we manufacture, ship, receive, retail and admin.


after1 after2 after3 after4 after5 after6

In my experience, the best mature skin that I see belongs to women that have been using natural products for an extended amount of time. Their wrinkles are minimal and skin is taut and firm thanks to all the topical nutrients they’ve been getting. The second best skin surprisingly belongs to people that claim to use nothing at all. They say things like “I just splash water on my face” or “I just use soap”. This is leading me to believe that conventional, petrochemical products are aging people’s skin prematurely. It makes sense since many of these chemicals are harsh and inflammatory and can stress the skin.

You may wonder why some celebrities have beautiful skin when they are clearly purchasing luxury lines that don’t make any ‘natural’ claims. This is because most of those high priced lines use a lot of botanicals in their formulas. Take for instance the very popular and expensive Crème de la Mer. It contains seaweed extract, lime, eucalyptus, lanolin, sesame, alfalfa, sunflower, and almond. Natural ingredients take up a good portion of this formula so it would be similar to a natural line in performance. When you look at a low priced (under $10) cream that you would buy at a drug store, it will be 100% petroleum and palm-based synthetics, which is how those massive companies are able to price it so low. This is where the bad performance comes in.

Natural is the way to go and the best thing about the green beauty industry is that you get the best bang for your buck because you get luxury ingredients that aren’t priced that way.


If a red, raised area suddenly appears on your face for no reason and doesn’t go away no matter how much balm or coconut oil you put on it, you might be dealing with unwanted bacteria from a skin care product, cosmetic or makeup brush. Staphylococcus, candida and e.coli are just some of the microbes that can be found in expired, abused (not stored properly) or under-preserved formula.

You will need to treat this area with an antibiotic ointment and/or anti-microbial essential oils. The most effective oils against staph are cinnamon, oregano, clove thyme and savory. These potent oils can be irritating to the skin so must be diluted to a maximum of 1%. You don’t want to further inflame the area. If it still doesn’t go away or improve after one day, visit your doctor. This is not something you want to mess with.

Prevention Tips

  • Throw out whatever you used before the infection appeared. You will probably know exactly what it was – something old or maybe a DIY formula.
  • Stay on top of your product’s expiry date. It will either be printed somewhere on the bottle or you will see a symbol of an open jar with a number inside that will indicate how many months after opening you can use it.
  • When you’re buying from small batch producers, ask them about the preservative that they use. If they say none, be skeptical. This is not a responsible way to create products and there are many great non-toxic, sustainable preservatives out there.
  • Buy products and use them up THEN buy more. Don’t stockpile them in your closet to never be seen again. If you don’t like it, throw it away or give it to someone that does.
  • Clean your make up brushes regularly.

Here is a chart showing the costs of the most common fixed oils (as in fatty, not volatile essential oils). I think this is great information to have when you are purchasing products. It’s important to know the value of what you are buying when you read the ingredients.

Cost of oils used in the beauty industry.

Cost of oils used in the beauty industry.


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